Category: Blog Posts

Helping Someone Through Grief: 7 Tips

One of the most common concerns people have is knowing what to say or do when a loved one dies. When it happens, even within our own families, we often don’t know what to say or do. Others don’t know what to say to us. So often, the response is to say or do nothing. The avoidance comes not out of a lack of compassion but out of a fear of saying or doing the wrong thing Continue reading →

No Face to Mental Illness

By Angela Kilgore

As you can see by these pictures, there is no face to mental illness. In reality these people are just pictures that I got off the internet.

“Fact: 43.8 million adults experience mental illness in a given year” (Mental Health Facts in America).

“Nearly 1 in 25 (10 million) adults in America live with a serious mental illness” (Mental Health Facts in America).

“One-half of all chronic mental illness begins by the age of 14; three-quarters by the age of 24”. (Mental Health Facts in America)

View Angela’s slide show

Therapy Can Change Your Life

We all have something in our life that we want to change. If someone says there is nothing to change, this should be a problem in and of itself.

How do people create change in their lives? Altering thoughts, modifying behaviors, setting goals, and creating/maintaining relationships are all great catalysts. Therapy is a way to help facilitate these behaviors.

My goal as a therapist is to help hold you accountable on the changes you wish to make. I do this by asking about your goals and how you are coming along. I also help with creating ideas that will add to these change behaviors. Therapy is a short-term process, but can have very a very long lasting impact. Once you change your habits and learn more about yourself, your life will begin to improve. If you do even more homework by reading self help books and challenge yourself to achieve even greater goals, you will continue to grow as a person.

Post Holidays

Starting in 2005, a British Psychologist, Cliff Arnall, believed that he calculated the most depressing day of the year.

He calls this Blue Monday and it occurs in mid to late January each year.  http://www.nydailynews.com/news/blue-monday-saddest-day-year-find-silver-lining-article-1.1007082

Arnall calculates this date on weather conditions, debt level (the difference between debt accumulated and our ability to pay), time since Christmas, time since failing our new year’s resolutions, low motivational levels and feeling of a need to take action Continue reading →

A Certified Financial Social Work Counselor’s (CFSW) Thoughts on Money

1.  How do you define the term, “Living within your means?”
First, you need to make sure you are spending less per month than you earn. Secondly, you need to insure that you are saving money for retirement and have at least a 6-month emergency fund.

2.  What is the difference of “living within your means” and “living below your means”?
I think of living below your means as saving a substantial amount of money… beyond the 6 month emergency fund, retirement, and any other basic savings necessities. Continue reading →

Work and Leisure?

Weisure is the term.  It refers to the mix of work and leisure.  Since virtually everyone is connected, it is so difficult to leave work at work.  Is it a bad thing?

Many say that work has become fun and is a huge joy in life.  Why not mix work and leisure? It could be more productive and satisfying.

I enjoy technology and am guilty of weisure on a regular basis.  However, balance is the key. If one obsesses over his or her work, this lack of relaxation is destructive.  It is important to be able to find a way to relax and enjoy life.  Remember that you work to live, instead of live to work Continue reading →

Depression in a Partner – How To Cope

By Eve Pearce

Depression is a major problem in Western society, affecting more and more people every year. When a partner is afflicted with this horrible disease, it can put a huge strain on a relationship.

While one partner becomes emotionally withdrawn, unmotivated, and perpetually sad, the other may become worried, frustrated, or wonder if this change is permanent and the person they love is lost forever. Depression is still a misunderstood condition. Its attendant emotions are very difficult for someone not suffering from it to comprehend, and even harder to witness in a loved one. If your partner is suffering from depression, the best thing to do is to seek professional help – both for their own sake and the sake of your relationship. Alongside this, there are a few important points to take on board to help you to understand, cope with, and help your suffering loved one. Continue reading →

Rise of Opiate Use Is Not the Answer to Relive Stress

By Eve Pearce

According to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2010 12 million people in the US used opiate drugs for purposes other than pain relief.

Abuse of prescription drugs such as morphine, oxycodone and codeine is a far bigger problem than use of heroin and many people are turning to opiates as a way to help them deal with stress. Prescription opiates are able to do this, as although they take longer to reach the brain than injected heroin, once there they exert similar effects. In the central nervous system these drugs bind to opioid receptors which not only aids pain relief but triggers feelings of pleasure, calm and well-being as well. However, they are not the answer for stress relief, as their use is associated with a number of adverse consequences. Only by addressing the root of the problem and developing appropriate strategies can stress be safely and successfully managed. Continue reading →